Friday, June 4, 2010

Not The Little Mermaid!

Advertising works. The strongest form of advertising, product placement. Just as product placement worked for Reese's Pieces, it also works for morals, values, and social norms. I believe that the acceptance of homosexuality is largely due to the introduction of homosexuality into media, starting small with the Lesbian Wedding on Friends, to Will and Grace, now most sitcoms now have the loveable homosexual sidekick.

This is why I flipped out over The Little Mermaid coming into my home.

Maybe flipped out is strong, but that DVD went right back into the netflix envelope from which it came. Brent's rational for ordering it: "I thought Samantha would like the songs." Oh, but the songs are about disobeying your parents, giving up your talents, ignoring your family and responsibility, sacrificing everything for a boy, and in your defiance living happily ever after, and all at the age of 16.

I've previously blogged about how Disney Princesses are the root of all evil, so recently a good friend forwarded this to me, which perfectly says why I am against everything princess and you'll never again find the Little Mermaid in my home.

16 comments:

lacy lee said...

I totally feel the same way. The thing is, though, there's no escaping Disney. We purposely avoid all things princess. But you can bet my 3 yr old daughter still somehow knows (and loves!) all those princesses names. Sigh. Now THAT'S the power of advertising.

brent said...

Lacy, I approve of the no-princess rule for my nieces.

The Lion King, although not princess-centric, gets my vote. Talk about gay!

Crystal said...

ugh I second everything you've listed...but at least they did a few things right with "Princess" Tiana (from Princess and the frog). Now THAT movie is definitely worth watching and owning.

brent said...

And by vote, I mean a vote to ban the film from future viewings. A vote of opposition, not approbation.

I re-read my comment and realized what I wrote was vague enough to be misconstrued.

brent = not gay

shenpawarrior said...

We were just watching a video about gender issues and Disney... women are only good for their looks at charms!

The best, I think, is to wait until kids are a bit older and use the movies as ways to bring up topics...

Christin said...

I totally agree, I had all sorts of weird idea's about love and relationships because of watching that garbage. Good for you for eliminating it from your home. It really is female porn.

Gwen said...

Haha, this is great. Especially The Little Mermaid. I remember specifically thinking the line from Little Mermaid when my dad said I needed to break up with me boyfriend in High School, "But Daddy I love him!"

Steve said...

You can keep the rest, but Ariel is TOTALLY on 'my list'!

Elizabeth said...

Thank you for posting this. I just came across your blog and would like to repost the picture. Very interesting...

Jeri and Amy said...

Kory, I'm curious to know what you think about Shrek-- you know, where "true love's form" is the chubby green ogre, not the traditional (yet with a contemporary J Lo booty) princess?

Comment 2: Don't go knocking Belle. She's a bookworm, a doting daughter, and a spunky little firecracker. She unflinchingly stands up to the Beast and, ultimately, it is a tale where the girl saves the prince, not the other way around. I'm actually a little surprised that this story doesn't resonate with you, Kory!

Salt H2O said...

Amy-

I like Shrek- I don't find Fiona remotely attractive (but I don't find JLo attractive either), which is my issue with the 'message' in Beauty and the Beast- Beauty happens to be ridiculously good looking talented girl that 'changes' a beast into a good and handsome person.

If girls are running around reading books to be like Belle- hurray! But what I think happens more frequently is women date projects that aren't worthy of them thinking they can change this guy.

Why is it the only fairy tail about an ugly girl where a handsome guy loves her is a 1970's mormon film?

(Johnny Lingo)

Deanne Hill said...

I used to watch Disney Princess movies when I was little and I can promise you I never once thought my looks and body were going to get me anywhere! I have two girls, one who didn't care about the world of princess and one who can't get enough. I really don't think kids think of the moral choices Ariel is making, that's what parents are for. We explained to our 8 year old that in the original story, Ariel turned into sea foam because of her poor choices. I still like the movie. So does she.
I'd much rather let my girls watch young women who at least try to be kind and helpful and explaining at age appropriate levels certain morality issues, than sheltering them from disney only to have Twilight rear it's ugly head with it's messages of lust over love, wanting to commit suicide if the other person isn't around and creepy stalker obsessions.
There will always be movies and media influences that I think are inappropriate, but that's why I'm here.

Salt H2O said...

Ugg, twilight.

LeAnn said...

I'm with Deanne. I watched all of these movies as a child and was never influenced by the ulgy undertones.

They are all out there. To let disney raise your kids with no teaching and guiding from parents, it's one thing, but to let them sing and dance and play and pretend i think is relatively harmless.

we can't shelter them forever. Disney is the easy one.

Salt H2O said...

DeAnne and LeAnn,

I don't fault anyone that wants to let their children watch princess movies. To each their own. Because of my background, I have a firm believe in the power of advertising. I see how quickly my little girl is absorbing the world around her, and I can't imagine that she could watch stories about helpless beautiful females that fall in love with out it impacting her view of the world.

I'm fine with my daughter singing and dancing, but pretending a prince is going to save her? I had far too many roomates in college that suffered from that dillusion.

Deanne Hill said...

I totally understand the roommates suffering from boy savior problems, but I still think it's a parental problem.
And I totally understand about watching your daughter be a sponge. My daughter started talking at 7 months (not kidding) and has a CRAZY WICKED memory for everything she sees and hears. It was a problem for us to try and deal with her creative, imaginative, over-inflated fantasy oriented mind. She knew the truth about Santa and still for years insisted that we had "lost the magic." Again, though, that's why we're here. I'm not talking just about the Princesses. I think it's important for kids (especially girls who are more prone IMO to this) to understand that fantasy is FANTASY. Setting aside rescuing issues, wicked people will not always be trying to kill you because of your beauty, won't turn into building -sized dragons, or create one ring to rule them all.

This lasts far beyond the years of dancing and singing to "Under the Sea." Twilight (not to beat a dead horse, sorry) is the perfect example. It is fantasy and yet, grown, married women who have not learned the meaning of FANTASY have used it as a spring board for discontent in their marriages and a misunderstanding of romance.